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Japanese Translation
Verse 12 Chicago + outro

Line 14:
Brush

Mr. Preiss said something that would make me think that brush is referring to a painting

Line 15:
Hush

This means quiet but Mr. Preiss said one thing “place after quiet”.

 

This is the end of all the hints I received from Mr. Preiss. How was it? Did it help at all? Mr. Preiss gave special advice hint to Japanese readers. Before you go reading the poems, look at the pictures. Then, taking all of the numbers in the poems you can then put those numbers in and put them into different combinations and then you can join them to the picture and you will probably get a hint. And he said also keep in mind when this book was made in America in 1982 on November currently it is March 1983 and so far over 500 people have sent in solutions but none of them are correct. I want Japanese readers to think of the solutions and for the Japanese readers to solve the puzzles. According to Mr. Preiss, it was very difficult to make the puzzles. When Mr. Preiss was burying the treasures he had trouble getting past customs in Canada with digging equipment.

For Educational Purposes Only

5 Comments

  1. Joel

    Referencing this, “Before you go reading the poems, look at the pictures. Then, taking all of the numbers in the poems you can then put those numbers in and put them into different combinations and then you can join them to the picture and you will probably get a hint.”, I have this theory: What Preiss probably originally said was not “…numbers in the poems…” but likely he said “…figures in the poems…” which was mistranslated either from English to Japanese, or later mistranslated from Japanese into English, or even a little bit both ways. What Preiss was intending was to provide help in matching the correct poem to the correct picture via (1) poem ‘descriptive figures’ (tall grass, arms outstretched, etc.), and (2) those same items found in the Palencar paintings. This method would help prevent the next 500 solutions from all being incorrect.
    Can any Japanese/English translator help confirm or deny this theory of mine? Is it even modestly possible?

    Reply
    • Gita

      That’s a reasonable hypothesis, but the Japanese says 数字, which means “numbers” as in “numerals.” … huh. Do all of the verses have arabic numerals in them?

      … no, they don’t, so it must mean numbers written in numerals or spelled out. Hmm.

      (Technically, some places might still translate it as “figures,” but it 100% means the old-fashioned meaning, like “facts and figures.”)

      Your thinking is definitely reasonable, especially since some of the translations here are a bit iffy, but I can’t see this specific hypothesis working. Still, what an interesting hint, especially as I would’ve assumed that if he were to hint about numbers, it would’ve been about the latitude/longitude in the pictures.

      There’s definitely something significant in that hint!

      Reply
      • Joel

        Hi Gita, thanks for your response. I submitted my response to yours, but did not put it in the reply section. See it below this reply.

        Reply
  2. Joel

    Hi Gita, and thanks for your response. I have tried unsuccessfully to find a mathematical way to match a verse to a picture. However, I will offer my matches, and the process I used to arrive at these matches: The book says on page 47 (not a numbered page, but right before the verses page 48); “Wed one picture With one verse…Goodness first”. The book does not tell you how to do this, but it appears to me to be a matter of finding a description in a verse, and then matching that up to the described figure in a picture. The verse description location, top, middle, or bottom, usually matches a similar location in the picture. The only verse that does not seem to work like that is the Verse 2, picture 9 matchup which simply uses the Litany of the Jewels to do the matchup using ‘Gnomes’. Using this method, I have:
    v1 – pic2 (Line 8 “No lion fears”),
    v2 – pic9 (L11, “Gnomes admire” – using the Litany to connect to the Dutch, pic9 is a ‘Dutch Masters’ type painting),
    v3 – pic11 (L12, “Feel at home”),
    v4 – pic4 (L13, “Seek the columns”),
    v5 – pic1 (L8, “Citadel in the night”),
    v6 – pic3 (this is one of the easiest ones to see, L14, “Between two arms extended”),
    v7 – pic8 (L4, “High posts are three”),
    v8 – pic10 (probably my fav; L3, “At a distance in time”, and L5, “At a distance in space” [these two lines are a perfect description of juggling]),
    v9 – pic6 (L14, “Over the tall grass”),
    v10 – pic12 (L12, “…3 Vols.”),
    v11 – pic7 (L9, “After circle and square”),
    v12 – pic5 (L9, “Fence and fixture”).

    Reply
  3. Joel

    I think I may have discovered the description match for v2. This should complete the pattern for all 12:

    V2 – pic9 (L4, “From end to end”) referring to the ends of the coat (sleeves)

    Reply

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